WEEK 25: Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941)

1940-49

Hey there, and welcome back – for the twenty-fifth time – to Weekly Hitch. This is a blog where I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order, no matter what they are, and then I try to work out why they’re good – if they’re good – and how they got that way.

This week, Hitchcock tackles one of his few outright comedies – with the amusing, American, and altogether unlikely screwball romance Mr. & Mrs. Smith.

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WEEK 18: Secret Agent (1936)

1930-39

And we’re back, once again, and welcome to week 18 of Weekly Hitch, a film-studies blog wherein I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies – in chronological order – and then I write about them, also in chronological order because that’s just how things happen in the world due to the relativistic nature of time and whatever.

This week, Hitch and us are riding high off the success of The 39 Steps and straight into a nearly forgotten and constantly overlooked espionage drama, 1936’s Secret Agent. So get ready for intrigue and drama, in a world where nothing is what it seems!

WEEK 8: The Manxman (1929)

1920-29

Hello again, and welcome back to Weekly Hitch – the blog wherein I watch all of Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order and you read, like, half a blog-post and then skim a bit because seriously who has time for this?

This week I watched Hitchcock’s last official silent film, and his first real adaptation of a novel, 1929’s religious-allegory/morality-tale/melodrama The Manxman. So buckle up, because things are about to get Hitchy.

WEEK 3: Downhill (1927)

1920-29

Welcome back to Weekly Hitch, where I watch most of Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order for a year and then try to make you read about it. Sort of like a school, but you don’t get tested or graded and I don’t know if you’re here.

For this third week, we continue on through Hitch’s early silent films at Gainsborough Studios, with his follow-up picture to The Lodger – a melodrama about the dangers of women and honesty, and Hitchcock’s fourth film; 1927’s Downhill.