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WEEK 25: Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941)

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Hey there, and welcome back – for the twenty-fifth time – to Weekly Hitch. This is a blog where I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order, no matter what they are, and then I try to work out why they’re good – if they’re good – and how they got that way.

This week, Hitchcock tackles one of his few outright comedies – with the amusing, American, and altogether unlikely screwball romance Mr. & Mrs. Smith.

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WEEK 19: Sabotage (1936)

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It’s that time again, time to dive into the past and look back at the films of Alfred Hitchcock – at the reasonable rate of one a week – which is what this blog does, and what I do along with it because I write it and also I don’t want the blog to get lonely.

This week we’re in the solid middle of six British suspense films that Hitchcock made in the 1930’s and a very solid entry into what I would call his “domestic thrillers” with a look at darkness and light in Sabotage.

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WEEK 18: Secret Agent (1936)

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And we’re back, once again, and welcome to week 18 of Weekly Hitch, a film-studies blog wherein I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies – in chronological order – and then I write about them, also in chronological order because that’s just how things happen in the world due to the relativistic nature of time and whatever.

This week, Hitch and us are riding high off the success of The 39 Steps and straight into a nearly forgotten and constantly overlooked espionage drama, 1936’s Secret Agent. So get ready for intrigue and drama, in a world where nothing is what it seems!

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WEEK 15: Waltzes From Vienna (1934)

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Hello, and welcome back to Weekly Hitch. This is a film studies style blog where I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s films in chronological order and then I write about them, usually in a meandering and unfocussed way that I then later find irritating, but all the same at least I’m not out doing crimes or whatever.

This week, my 15th (!) week on the project, we dance our way in to a movie that Hitchcock described as “the lowest ebb” of his career – and also one of the films that stands out as the most atypical for the director. It’s a musical-operetta-comedy-period-biopic about Johann Strauss, and it’s called Waltzes From Vienna.

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WEEK 10: Juno And The Paycock (1930)

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Hello again, whoever you are, and welcome to week ten of Weekly Hitch – a film studies blog in which I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies, in chronological order, and then talk about them into a computer. It’s like having a friend show you slides of a trip to Italy, but instead of slides it’s opinions and instead of Italy it’s old movies.

This week, we enter the 1930’s with Hitchcock’s adaptation of one of Ireland’s most famous plays – there’s religious symbolism aplenty and lots more experimenting and adapting to sound. So let’s begin, with 1930’s Juno And The Paycock.

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WEEK 9: Blackmail (1929)

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Hello once again, and welcome back to Weekly Hitch. This is a film studies project sort of thing in which I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s films, in chronological order, and then analyze them to the best of my meagre ability. It’s sort of like I’m going to a very weird film school, and you have to read all my homework.

This week, our last week in the twenties, also brings us our very first film with actual synchronized sound – and brings Hitchcock back to form (and to murder) with a morally ambiguous and rather startlingly raw thriller with 1929’s Blackmail.

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WEEK 8: The Manxman (1929)

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Hello again, and welcome back to Weekly Hitch – the blog wherein I watch all of Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order and you read, like, half a blog-post and then skim a bit because seriously who has time for this?

This week I watched Hitchcock’s last official silent film, and his first real adaptation of a novel, 1929’s religious-allegory/morality-tale/melodrama The Manxman. So buckle up, because things are about to get Hitchy.

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WEEK 5: The Ring (1928)

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Welcome back, if you are indeed back, to week five of Weekly Hitch – the blog in which I watch as many of Hitchcock’s films as possible, in chronological order, and then analyze them in far too much detail, while also being not quite insightful enough. Basically, it’s like a film nerd’s podcast, but written down.

This week, we journey with Hitch to a new film company – a new producer, new actors, new cameraman, and a new writer… Hitchcock himself! It’s an impressive, and expressionistic feast for the eyes – it’s 1928’s The Ring.