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WEEK 26: Suspicion (1941)

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Hello! And another happy welcome to the increasingly-inaccurately named Weekly Hitch. This is a blog wherein I attempt to watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s films in order, at about a movie a week, and then I write about them sporadically because life is hard.

This week, Hitchcock takes a step back from the comedy of Mr. & Mrs. Smith and heads for the safer harbour of romantic melodrama, with the very Rebecca-like and Joan Fontaine-starring RKO marriage tale… Suspicion.

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WEEK 25: Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941)

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Hey there, and welcome back – for the twenty-fifth time – to Weekly Hitch. This is a blog where I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order, no matter what they are, and then I try to work out why they’re good – if they’re good – and how they got that way.

This week, Hitchcock tackles one of his few outright comedies – with the amusing, American, and altogether unlikely screwball romance Mr. & Mrs. Smith.

Two amazing ladies.

WEEK 23: Rebecca (1940)

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Hello! And welcome back once again, to Weekly Hitch. This is a film-studies sort of blog in which I watch all of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies in chronological order and then write about them and try to learn things. It’s like a hobby, only I try make other people join in against their will.

For week 23 here at Weekly Hitch, we – and Hitchcock – enter the 1940’s and move to America for Hitch’s biggest, and possibly best film yet. It’s a classic tale of romance and suspense, and teamed Hitch up with one of the great producers of the age, David O Selznick. So, read on if you like, as I learn about 1940’s Rebecca.

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WEEK 13: Rich and Strange (1931)

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It’s lucky week 13 here at Weekly Hitch, which is a film studies blog wherein I watch every one of Hitchcock’s movies, in chronological order, and then I write about them and what I think about them. Sort of like a book report, but instead of books – which don’t move, I write about films – which do.

This week we’re taking a look at Hitch’s 1931 comedic travelog Rich and Strange, adapted by Hitch and Alma from a novel by Dale Collins. It’s a light and frivolous movie, and only slightly removed from plausibility, so here we go with Rich And Strange.